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Austin Manuals pdf

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Austin Gipsy MK4 Workshop Manual 1964
Austin Gipsy MK4 Workshop Manual 1964
austin gipsy_mk4_workshop manual 1964.pd
Adobe Acrobat Document 28.5 MB
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Austin MG Metro Manual
Austin MG Metro Manual
Austin MG Metro Manual.pdf
Adobe Acrobat Document 486.2 KB
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Austin G YG manual 1944
Austin G YG manual 1944
Austin G YG manual 1944.pdf
Adobe Acrobat Document 8.7 MB
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Austin A40 Models Series GS4 GD3 GD5 GV4 GP4 CQU4 Manual 1957
Austin A40 Models Series GS4 GD3 GD5 GV4 GP4 CQU4 Manual 1957
Austin A40 Models Series GS4 GD3 GD5 GV4
Adobe Acrobat Document 15.8 MB

Austin History

1909 saw the introduction of a smaller, cheaper engined car: the 15. The 15 was unusual in that the driver sat centrally and above the engine. The 15 continued in production until 1919. By 1910 nearly 1,000 workers were employed at Longbridge and a night shift was found to be necessary. The 10 was announced at the Motor Show of 1910. This was another small, cheap model aimed at the Continental market, and made available in Britain in 1911. 1910 also saw the introduction of a very small, single cylinder engined model 7. Only 1 model 7 was built at Longbridge before production was transferred to the Swift Works in Coventry, a company owned by Harvey du Cros. The Company successfully diversified into marine engines and also produced a 2/3 ton lorry in 1913. In February 1914 the Company went into public ownership, the capitalisation realising £250,000.

 

1968 BMC was taken over by Leyland to become The British Leyland Motor Company, or BLMC. The Austin Maxi, Princess, Ambassador, Maestro and Montego were built at Cowley. A very small number of Morris Itals were built at Longbridge in the period 1984-1984. Many people saw the Marina/Ital as a backward step, unkindly referring to it as a rebodied Morris Minor. This was not true, the car could be favourably compared to its contemporary, the Hillman Avenger. The Austin Allegro, with its quartic steering wheel, was launched in 1971. It suffered many teething problems, amongst them the fact that the boot lid was too small for the boot aperture, windscreens would pop out because tolerances couldn't be maintained. Despite this over 660,000 cars were produced before it ceased production in 1982. 

 

The Austin Mini Metro Launched in 1980 and the Metro brought the restoration of the Austin name to a BL car. To quote Harold Musgrove, Chairman of BL's Light/Medium Cars Group"....we were confident that there was scope to re-establish the Austin name....Metro represents everything that is world renowned about Austin engineering: unparalleled use of interior space, coupled with astonishing economy and refinement...". In 1986 Austin Rover became known as the Rover Group and the car lost its Austin badge in 1987. The Rover Metro became the Rover 100, which it remained until it ceased production in 1997. 

 

http://www.classic-car-magazine.co.uk/image_gallery/austin_motor_car_company_history_the_modern_later_years.html

 

 

Austin Ambassador
Austin Ambassador